Turkey exports Striker armored vehicle for the first time: to Kosovo

According to local new sources Turkey has exported its armored combat vehicle Vuran (Striker) for the first time: to Kosovo.

Turkey’s Anadolu Agency said the pseudo-government of Kosovo will be the first foreign recipient of the 4×4 multi-purpose armored vehicle. Wikipedia, though, says that Libya has also purchased the vehicle from Turkey. Both Kosovo and the nation it was part of in 1999, the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, and Libya in 2011 were bombed relentlessly and mercilessly by NATO ostensibly in the name of “humanitarian intervention.” As was predicted by some, the main beneficiary of both wars has been the Turkish military.

Although Turkey enthusiastically supported the 78-day war against Yugoslavia, an on-the-ground article in The Irish Times reported shortly after NATO and its cutthroat Kosovo Liberation Army cohorts took over the Serbian province that the Turkish government was forced to evacuate ethnic Turks to Turkey for fear of them falling victim to Kosovo Liberation Army depredations. Similarly, Israel flew the small Jewish community in the Kosovo capital of Pristina to Tel Aviv. Hundreds of thousands of ethnic Serbs, Gorans, Roma, Ashkali, Egyptians, Turks and Jews were terrorized into fleeing Kosovo, if they weren’t brutally murdered first. The humanitarian bomber/cruise missile Left brigades lost interest in Kosovo after NATO and the KLA “delivered it from genocide” and have never bothered to concern themselves with the above horrors.

At the Antalya Diplomacy Forum two weeks ago one of the participants was Kosovo President Vjosa Osmani. The latter’s government is not universally recognized and is not a member of the United Nations largely due to the efforts of nations like Russia, China, India and Indonesia, all of whom adamantly opposed NATO’s war of 1999.

NATO has obligingly bombed into submission, into rubble, into non-existence countries strategically situated to advance Turkey’s expanding geopolitical and military ambitions. Having used Ankara in the past to sponsor/mentor nations like Bulgaria and Romania in preparation for NATO accession – both joined at the 2004 summit in Turkey – NATO continues to employ Turkey as its spearhead into Southeast Europe, the Middle East, the South Caucasus and North Africa: what the military bloc identifies as its southern and southeastern flanks.

Turkish Vurans. Photo from Wikipedia.

The Vurans sold to Kosovo and Libya are widely used by the Turkish military and security forces; over 700 have been ordered by the Land Forces and the Gendarmerie General Command.

They are the latest example of Turkey shipping military equipment overseas of late. Ankara has sold the Bayraktar Tactical (Bayraktar TB) unmanned combat aerial vehicle to Qatar (with which it’s reached an agreement to host the latter’s warplanes and troops), Azerbaijan and Ukraine, and has recently announced the sale of the drones to fellow NATO nations for the first time: Albania and Poland.

Turkey has in many ways superseded the European members of the NATO Quint – Britain, France, Germany and Italy – as the bloc’s major military power second only to the U.S., and all indications are that it will continue to expand that role.